January News Summary

Roots of migration.

  • U Ko Ni, a prominent human rights lawyer and a legal adviser to Myanmar’s leader, Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, was shot and killed at Yangon International airport.[i]
  • Preliminary meetings were held in 15 places inside and outside Shan State to achieve consensus amongst Shan people ahead of the second Union Peace Conference. Ethnic armed groups, political parties, and CSOs are organizing the meetings to collect public opinions and present them at the peace conference for discussion.[ii]
  • The Myanmar government announced that it will set up two major checkpoints in Hsenwi Township, northern Shan State and in Mon State’s Kyaikhto Township on the Chinese and Thai borders as part of its anti-smuggling plan.[iii]
  • The Myanmar government is considering increasing deposits paid by overseas employment agencies by ten times what it is now in order to improve protection of workers abroad. Officials say the extra money will be used to expand an emergency fund that helps workers if they are abandoned by an agency or encounter other problems while abroad.[iv] 
  • The Thai Labour Ministry issued a statement urging migrant workers to have their nationalities verified by their respective countries or risk being deported after their work permits expire this year. The decision follows a recent cabinet resolution to enforce regulations agreed upon in an MoU with neighboring countries that states migrants must be verified by their home countries.[v]
  • The UN Women Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific launched a research study on domestic migrant workers in Thailand. The study notes that about 73% of all migrant domestic workers are women, and that the Asia and Pacific region is home to 40 percent of all domestic workers in the world. In Thailand, 250,000 migrant domestic workers are from Laos, Myanmar, Cambodia, and Vietnam.[vi]
  • In 2016, nearly 50,000 Cambodians who came to work in Thailand were returned to Cambodia in 1,159 vans through Poipet border gate because of their unauthorized status. Over 16,000 of them were women and more than 4,000 were children.[vii]
  • The Thai government, with support from the European Union, the IOM, and local NGOs are moving forward on a project to provide support to undocumented Myanmar Muslims—most of them Rohingya refugees—by improving access to basic services like education and healthcare in Tak, Ranong, and Phang Nga provinces.[viii]
  • Thailand was home to four million migrants in 2016.[ix]
  • The UN Population Fund estimates that some 4.25 million people born in Myanmar now live abroad. The majority of people from Myanmar living abroad come from border areas such as Mawlamyine in Mon State and Hpa-an in Karen State and most now live in Thailand and Malaysia.[x]  

Borders. 

  • The Myanmar government announced that it will set up two major checkpoints in Hsenwi Township, northern Shan State and in Mon State’s Kyaikhto Township on the Chinese and Thai borders as part of its anti-smuggling plan.[i]

Labor.

  • The Myanmar government is considering increasing deposits paid by overseas employment agencies by ten times what it is now in order to improve protection of workers abroad. Officials say the extra money will be used to expand an emergency fund that helps workers if they are abandoned by an agency or encounter other problems while abroad.[i] 
  • The Thai Labour Ministry issued a statement urging migrant workers to have their nationalities verified by their respective countries or risk being deported after their work permits expire this year. The decision follows a recent cabinet resolution to enforce regulations agreed upon in an MoU with neighboring countries that states migrants must be verified by their home countries.[ii]
  • The UN Women Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific launched a research study on domestic migrant workers in Thailand. The study notes that about 73% of all migrant domestic workers are women, and that the Asia and Pacific region is home to 40 percent of all domestic workers in the world. In Thailand, 250,000 migrant domestic workers are from Laos, Myanmar, Cambodia, and Vietnam.[iii]
  • In 2016, nearly 50,000 Cambodians who came to work in Thailand were returned to Cambodia in 1,159 vans through Poipet border gate because of their unauthorized status. Over 16,000 of them were women and more than 4,000 were children.[iv]
Education.
  • The Thai government, with support from the European Union, the IOM, and local NGOs are moving forward on a project to provide support to undocumented Myanmar Muslims—most of them Rohingya refugees—by improving access to basic services like education and healthcare in Tak, Ranong, and Phang Nga provinces.[i]
 Statistics on migration.
  • Thailand was home to four million migrants in 2016.[i]
  • The UN Population Fund estimates that some 4.25 million people born in Myanmar now live abroad. The majority of people from Myanmar living abroad come from border areas such as Mawlamyine in Mon State and Hpa-an in Karen State and most now live in Thailand and Malaysia.[ii]  
 

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