WRITER: Emma Harlan 

A Men’s Exchange program might not seem like an obvious step in a mission to end gender-based violence within the migrant community. Shouldn’t the focus be on the empowerment of women? Well, after twenty years of working on the issue through MAP’s Women’s Exchange programs, migrant women have realized that they should be able to work with the men in their lives—not in opposition to them. However, in order to do that, the men were going to need some training.

On August 3rd and 4th, MAP ran the first ever Men’s Exchange: Training of Trainers (TOT) event. With support from Canada Fund, this project aimed to “combat gender-based violence among migrant and refugee women through social networking and capacity building.” The event worked to tackle the issue of gender-based violence in a new way--by getting the men involved in the process. Over two days, men peer leaders from five different locations bordering Thailand and Myanmar worked to develop the skills to run Men’s Exchange (ME) events in their own communities.

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As part of the Community Health and Empowerment (CHE) sector of the MAP Foundation, MAP employees visit migrant workers dealing with various health related problems. On Thursday June 13th, the MAP outreach team and the summer 2019 interns from Emory University visited a baby girl named Duang in a nearby community. Duang was one and a half years old and was born prematurely. Since birth, Duang has had problems breathing and needs help inhaling an adequate amount of oxygen. At 7 months doctors decided to put a hole in Duang’s neck to help her breathe because she had frequent fevers and breathing issues.

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As part of the Community Health and Empowerment (CHE) sector of the MAP Foundation, MAP employees visit migrant workers dealing with various health related problems. On Friday June 7th, the MAP outreach team and the summer 2019 interns from Emory University visited two patients at a nearby hospital. One patient was suffering from coronary heart disease and another was recuperating from problems resulting from a blood vessel that had burst in his brain.

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As part of the Community Health and Empowerment (CHE) sector of the MAP Foundation, MAP employees visit migrant workers dealing with various health related problems. On Thursday May 30th, the MAP outreach team was joined by the summer 2019 interns from Emory University, located in the United States. This was their first experience going on outreach with CHE. That day CHE met with two patients, who were both in the process of getting treatment for Tuberculosis (TB).